“My friends, we live in the greatest nation in the history of the world. I hope you’ll join with me as we try to change it.” . . . Barack Obama . .

QUOTES FOR THE WEEK, MARCH 20, 2011collected
by Grant Kuhns

 
“I think all the world would gain by setting commerce at perfect liberty.” . . . Thomas Jefferson . . .
 
“Blue Shield of California’s decision to cancel a big rate hike for nearly 200,000 people followed mounting pressure from the public and political leaders. But an unforeseen factor may have made the retreat easier for the company to accept: It’s paying out less for medical claims than it had anticipated. . . . Company officials say that is largely because people are going to the doctor less. Many have switched to cheaper policies that require them to shoulder a greater share of the cost — and that has them thinking twice about discretionary visits. . . . That trend could bolster the arguments of some healthcare experts who contend that Americans overuse medical services because they generally don’t have to pay much for them, and that the only way to bring rising healthcare costs under control is to shift more of the expense to patients. . . . If people continue to be more thrifty in their medical decisions, it could slow the rise of healthcare costs, some believe.” . . . Los Angeles Times, March 16, 2011 . . .
 
“Ancient man was just as smart as we are. So what happened? Freedom. A political system of liberty gives us the opportunity to use our talents and to cooperate with others to create and produce, with help of a few simple institutions that protect our rights. And those simple institutions – property rights, the rule of law, a prohibition on the initiation of force – make possible invention, innovation, and progress in commerce, technology, and styles of living. When libertarians defend limited government, we are defending freedom and the progress it brings.” . . . David Boaz, executive VP, The CATO Institute . . .
 
“The recognition of the insuperable limits to his knowledge ought indeed to teach the student of society a lesson in humility which should guard him against becoming an accomplice in men’s fatal striving to control society—a striving which makes him not only a tyrant over his fellows, but which may well make him the destroyer of a civilization which no brain has designed but which has grown from the free efforts of millions of individuals.” . . . F. A. Hayek, In his 1974 Nobel Memorial Lecture, “The Pretence of Knowledge.” . . .
 
“Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.” . . . British author C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) . . .
 
“Those countries with greater economic liberty and private property rights tend also to have stronger protections of human rights. And as an important side benefit of that greater economic liberty and human rights protections, their people are wealthier. We need to persuade our fellow man around the globe that liberty is a necessary ingredient for prosperity.” . . . professor of economics, Walter E. Williams . . .
 
“Today, we tend to think of John D. Rockefeller as just one of those famous rich people. But Rockefeller didn’t just ‘happen to have money.’ How he got rich is the real story — and it is a story whose implications reach far beyond that one particular individual. Before Rockefeller’s innovations reduced the price of kerosene to a fraction of what it had once been, there wasn’t a lot for poor people to do when nightfall came, other than go to bed. But the advent of cheap kerosene added hours of light and activity to each day for people with low or moderate incomes. … Henry Ford’s mass production methods cut in half the cost of producing the famous Model T Ford in just five years. People who had once lived their entire lives within a narrow radius of a relatively few miles could now go see places they never knew about before. … Today we seldom even know the names of those who have made … monumental contributions to human well-being. All we know is that some people have gotten ‘rich’ and that this is to be regarded as some sort of grievance. Many of the people we honor today are people who are skilled in the rhetoric of grievances and promises of new ‘rights’ at someone else’s expense. But is that what is going to make a better America?” . . . economist Thomas Sowell . . .
 
“Wildly inaccurate statements from news commentators, financial analysts, politicians and even administration officials have most people believing that if Congress does not increase the debt limit in March, the U.S. government will default on its debt obligations, thus ending the government’s ability to borrow. Nonsense! … If you make $5000 per month, have a mortgage payment of $1500 per month and then spend another $4500 per month on food, utilities, gasoline, insurance and other expenses, including $2000 per month on traveling to sporting events and going to expensive restaurants, you will find yourself running a deficit of $1000 per month. Your choice is to default on your mortgage and ruin you credit rating or cut back on sporting events and expensive restaurants. … The U.S. government is in exactly the same position. If the debt ceiling is not raised, government officials will have a choice to default on interest payments (less than 10 percent of the government’s total income) or cut spending.” . . . economist Richard W. Rahn, The Washington Times, Feb 8, 2011 – “Destructive Economic Myths” . . .
 
“My friends, we live in the greatest nation in the history of the world. I hope you’ll join with me as we try to change it.” . . . Barack Obama . . .
 
“I won’t insult your intelligence by suggesting that you really believe what you just said.” . . . William F. Buckley, Jr. (1925-2008) . . .

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