Grant’s – QUOTES FOR THE WEEK, MAY 29, 2011

 
“If a man hasn’t discovered something that he will die for, he isn’t fit to live.” . . . Martin Luther King Jr. . . .
 
“I have no illusions about what little I can add now to the silent testimony of those who gave their lives willingly for their country. Words are even more feeble on this Memorial Day, for the sight before us is that of a strong and good nation that stands in silence and remembers those who were loved and who, in return, loved their countrymen enough to die for them. Yet, we must try to honor them not for their sakes alone, but for our own. And if words cannot repay the debt we owe these men, surely with our actions we must strive to keep faith with them and with the vision that led them to battle and to final sacrifice.” . . . Ronald Reagan . . .
 
“Standard & Poor announced that they will change their outlook on the fiscal health of the United States over the next two years from ‘stable’ to ‘negative.’ The administration decried this decision as ‘political.’ The only thing political about this decision is that it took so long. … The Washington Post recently reported that the White House and the Treasury Department put tremendous pressure on S&P not to do this. However, if S&P made its ratings based on political pressure rather than economic reality, it would cease to have relevance to the business community. … Even the most conservative budget that has ben proposed by Republican leadership requires raising the debt ceiling an additional $9 trillion by 2021. This demonstrates that no one in power right now has any real intention of addressing our spending problems or paying down the debt.” . . . Rep. Ron Paul (TX) . . .
 
“Passing a yearly budget for the federal government is a fundamental responsibility of Congress. Lawmakers do not have to spend their time naming post offices or passing healthcare reform. But they do have to pass a budget. In 2010, neither the House nor the Senate did so. It’s not that members just didn’t get around to it, which would have been scandalous enough. No, Reid and then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi feared that passing a budget would hurt their chances in the November midterm elections. So they did nothing and took a beating at the polls anyway. . . . Now Pelosi is out of the picture. But Reid is still at it. The Republican-controlled House has passed a budget, but Reid will not produce a Democratic spending proposal. And if Reid doesn’t want to pass a budget, then a budget won’t be passed; the majority leader controls what is and what is not considered in the Senate. … The most amazing thing about all this is that Reid’s abdication of responsibility has attracted so little attention. In a country drowning in debt, where’s the outrage?” . . . political correspondent Byron York . . .
 
“It is not the fact of liberty but the way in which liberty is exercised that ultimately determines whether liberty itself survives.” . . . journalist Dorothy Thompson (1893-1961) . . .
 
“Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human liberty; it is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves.” . . . William Pitt (1708-1778) . . .
 
“Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.” . . . Benjamin Franklin . . .
 
“Liberty means responsibility. That’s why most men dread it.” . . . George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) . . .
 
“The history of liberty is a history of the limitation of governmental power, not the increase of it.” . . . Woodrow Wilson . . .
 
“In The Federalist, James Madison called the rage for equality ‘a wicked project.’ People differ and rewards differ—that’s the essence of both liberty and justice. No nation that rewards effort, talent, inventiveness and luck can even pretend to cherish equal outcomes. In an inventive and dynamic society, equal (even relatively equal) incomes can be achieved only by abandoning liberty for tyranny.” . . . author, philosopher Michael Novak . . .
 
“The first step in saving our liberty is to realize how much we have already lost, how we lost it, and how we will continue to lose it unless fundamental political changes occur.” . . . author, lecturer James Bovard . . .

“The essential characteristic of Western civilization that distinguishes it from the arrested and petrified civilizations of the East was and is its concern for freedom from the state. The history of the West, from the age of the Greek polis down to the present-day resistance to socialism, is essentially the history of the fight for liberty against the encroachments of the officeholders.” . . . economist Ludwig Von Mises (1881-1973) . . .
 
“I have little interest in streamlining government or in making it more efficient, for I mean to reduce its size. I do not undertake to promote welfare, for I propose to extend freedom. My aim is not to pass laws, but to repeal them. It is not to inaugurate new programs, but to cancel old ones that do violence to the Constitution, or that have failed in their purpose, or that impose on the people an unwarranted financial burden. I will not attempt to discover whether legislation is needed before I have first determined whether it is constitutionally permissible. And if I should later be attacked for neglecting my constituents’ interests, I shall reply that I was informed their main interest is liberty.” . . . Sen. Barry Goldwater (1909-1998) . . .
 
“After order and liberty, economy is one of the highest essentials of a free government.” . . . Calvin Coolidge . . .
 
“Freedom is not synonymous with an easy life…. There are many difficult things about freedom: It does not give you safety, it creates moral dilemmas for you; it requires self-discipline; it imposes great responsibilities; but such is the nature of Man and in such consists his glory and salvation.” . . . Margaret Thatcher . .

Advertisements

I Love it When you Talk Back!

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s