QUOTES FOR THE WEEK, JUNE 19, 2011

 
“As any father knows, perhaps the greatest challenge of parenthood is helping to create and shape little children who will spend their lives with a preference and propensity to give and earn, rather than to merely receive and take.” . . . author, marketing exec., Rebecca Hagelin . . .
 
Is it really necessary to explain that government is force? When the Salvation Army asks you for a donation, you are free to say no, and you suffer no consequences. When the U.S. government demands a tax return and a check on April 15, you can’t say no and go about your business. You comply or face fines or imprisonment. Yes, you get to vote for candidates periodically. But having an infinitesimal say in who will coerce you doesn’t change that fact that they are using force.. . .There are only two ways to get people to do things: force or persuasion. Government is all about force. Government has nothing it hasn’t first expropriated from some productive person. In contrast, the private sector — whether nonprofit or a greedy business — must work through persuasion and consent. No matter how rich Bill Gates gets, he cannot force us to buy his software. Outside government, actions are voluntary, and voluntary is better because it reflects the free judgment of creative, productive people. . . . Fox Business News host John Stossel . . .
 
“Big government by its very nature is government that intrudes in people’s lives, usurps their rights and responsibilities and confiscates their money. There is nothing conservative about any of this. Regardless of how benevolent and well-meaning its intentions are, government expands almost entirely for the purpose of controlling and regulating the lives of its citizens. Each act of government, each law passed, each regulation written is a step toward limiting the freedom of some one or some group or some organization or some business or industry. Granted, some of these steps may be necessary but most of them are not. So let’s not kid ourselves. If conservatives are people who put freedom ahead of security and individual rights ahead of government control, then it must follow that they are opposed to big government. This being the case, a policy of ‘big government conservatism’ is merely an excuse for wayward conservatives to justify moving leftward and anyone who denies this is an ignoramus, a fool or a hypocrite.” . . . journalist and political consultant Lyn Nofziger (1924-2006) . . .
 
“In the end, the deficit is more of a metaphor than something real. Republicans use it as a shorthand way of saying spending should be lower, while Democrats use it to imply that taxes should be higher.” . . . historian, political pundit Bruce Bartlett (7/18/03) . . .
 
“If the profit per gallon of gas were reduced to zero, would that be enough to reduce the price by even a dime? If the oil company executives were to work free of charge, would that be enough to reduce the price of gasoline by even a penny a gallon? . . . The government collects far more in taxes on every gallon of gasoline than the oil companies collect in profits. If oil company profits are “obscene,” as some politicians claim, are the government’s taxes PG-13? . . . Cheap demagoguery cannot explain expensive gas. Nothing is easier, or more emotionally satisfying, than blaming high prices on those who charge them, rather than on those who cause them.”. . . economist Thomas Sowell . . .
 
“Americans’ energy problems are not, as President Bush declared, because Americans have an ‘addiction to oil.’ Our energy problems stem from the failed leadership of Democrats and Republicans.” . . . Rep. Michael A. Fox (OH) . . .
 
“Politicians look at the current oil price crunch as an opportunity—but not to increase Domestic exploration, promote free-market investment in alternative fuels and research, or let the market work as it should. No, this is of course an opportunity to raise taxes on oil companies and oil refiners-who will have to pass these costs on to you in higher prices. Not only will this raise prices even higher, but it will ensure our dependence upon foreign oil by limiting domestic oil exploration in the United States.” . . . policy analyst David Strom . . .
 
“The frequent delegation of legislative power to the bureaucracy is indeed a very big problem for responsible representative government. Typical example: When Congress created the FCC it authorized the new agency to make rules consistent with the “public interest and necessity.” It is difficult to see how Congress could have been more vague, or delegated any more of the details to the bureaucracy. That’s regulation without representation. Congressional delegation of rule making to the Executive Branch bureaucracy is a violation of the Constitution’s separation of powers. This problem needs to be fixed.” . . . writer, activist Jim Babka . . .
 
“NAFTA is not a free trade agreement, just as the PATRIOT Act was not about patriotism and the Social Security Act was neither social nor secure. The NAFTA is over 1,000 pages. If NAFTA really did nothing but establish free trade, it would be the size of a postcard, and there would currently be no tariffs between Mexico and the US.” . . . economist Robert P. Murphy . . .
 
“The left is forever pushing the term ‘sustainable.’ It seems to mean ‘severely limited under central government control.’ Permit me to repossess that perfectly good word. Let it mean what it ought to: capable of lasting without artificial props. Then let’s apply it where it’s desperately needed: Creating Sustainable Freedom. But how? So far, nobody has figured that out. Freedom can’t be sustained by bits of paper, however noble their intent. Freedom can’t be sustained by guns, useful though guns may be in discouraging both freelance and tax-supported gangsters. Freedom certainly can’t be sustained with vast edifices of legislation, regulation, and punishment. That’s one of the great cons of all time — believing the very destroyers of freedom can be freedom’s saviors.To endure, freedom must be self-governing and self-regenerating.” . . . author and columnist Claire Wolfe (July 2006) . . .
 
“The government has very little power to do good for the economy, but very great power to do harm.” . . . economics Nobel laureate Milton Friedman (1912-2006) . . .
 
Make it a great weekend . . .
 
Grant

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