Grant’s QUOTES FOR THE WEEK, JUNE 26, 2011

 
“As our president bears no resemblance to a king so we shall see the Senate has no similitude to nobles. First, not being hereditary, their collective knowledge, wisdom, and virtue are not precarious. For by these qualities alone are they to obtain their offices, and they will have none of the peculiar qualities and vices of those men who possess power merely because their father held it before them.” . . . Tench Coxe, An American Citizen, No. 2, 1787 . . .
 
“Politicians invariably respond to crises — that, in most cases, they themselves created — by spawning new government programs, laws and regulations. These, in turn, generate more havoc and poverty, which inspires the politicians to create more programs . . . and the downward spiral repeats itself until the productive sectors of the economy collapse under the collective weight of taxes and other burdens imposed in the name of fairness, equality and do-goodism..” . . . author Steven Moore . . .
 
“U.S. corn prices increased threefold from early 2006 to May 2008, with ethanol production being an important contributing factor. Consumers are now reaping the results—increased prices for bread, milk, beef, chicken, and other food products. In short, the government-mandated ethanol program is imposing huge costs on taxpayers and consumers. . . . Agricultural subsidies transfer wealth from taxpayers, and in some cases consumers, to farmers, suppliers of farm inputs—including machinery, fertilizer, seed, and pesticides—and other businesses involved in the production and marketing of farm commodities. They obviously have no place in a free economy.” . . . author, agriculture professor and economist E. C. Pasour, Jr. . . .
 
“[I]t was extraordinary to hear Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke acknowledge last week that he has “no idea” why our economy is so “fragile.” This is the man who has overseen the lending of more than $3 trillion American taxpayer dollars to foreign banks; the rapid-fire acquisition of the former giant Merrill Lynch by the gargantuan Bank of America; the multi-billion dollar taxpayer bailout of Wall Street; and the $800 billion “economic stimulus bill” from the Congress and the Obama Administration. … And now, this man with immense power over the entire world’s wealth and yet who has never been elected to any public office, has to admit that he has “no idea” why things aren’t going the way they were “supposed to.” As Trisha, a caller to one of my daily talk shows noted to me last Thursday, “We pay these people in Washington waaay too much money for them to simply ‘not know'” . . . columnist, talk show host, Austin Hill . . .
 
“Years ago I developed the ‘Armey Curve’ to explain the negative burden government has on prosperity. The idea, borrowing liberally from Arthur Laffer’s curve (which demonstrates that tax revenues fall when the tax burden gets so high that it no longer pays to work), is that at some point the burden of government spending exceeds the private economy’s ability to carry it. ‘Stimulus’ spending often does more harm than good, because it takes more money out of the system than it creates and thereby destroys jobs and leads to stagnation and diminished prosperity for all.” . . . former House Majority Leader Dick Armey . . .
 
“The salient feature of America in the Age of Obama is a failed government class institutionally committed to living beyond its means, and a citizenry too many of whom are content to string along.” . . . columnist Mark Steyn . . .
 
“A recent poll showed that nearly half the American public believes the government should redistribute wealth. That so many people are so willing to blithely put such an enormous and dangerous arbitrary power in the hands of politicians — risking their own freedom, in hopes of getting what someone else has — is a painful sign of how far many citizens and voters fall short of what is needed to preserve a democratic republic.” . . . economist Thomas Sowell . . .
 
“Back before the Unites States was an independent nation, people lived in horrific conditions under British rule. The British weren’t providing very good free health care (wait time for a poor person to get an MRI was over 200 years), they were refusing to increase taxes on the rich, and they had very few laws dictating what colonists were allowed to eat, causing many to become obese on the high-fructose maize syrup the Indians taught them to make. So the colonists kept demanding that the British give them big government to regulate their lives and provide for their basic needs while confiscating all their wealth. ‘We’re stupid,’ they’d cry out to the British. ‘Please rule us and make us do what you think is best!’ But the British kept refusing, saying, ‘No, you guys are doing okay by yourselves. We want you to have the freedom to run your own lives.’ It was this laissez-faire attitude that led to the Boston Massacre, in which five people died of heart attacks in Boston from eating fatty foods a proper government would never have let them eat in the first place. Finally the colonists had enough of not being bossed around and decided if the British weren’t going to provide them the all-encompassing government they wanted, they had to make it themselves. They started by throwing tea into the Boston Harbor since they determined it had too much caffeine and people shouldn’t have been allowed to drink it. Then they formed militias to collect more taxes from the colonists to spend on welfare and government works projects. The British tried to strike back by ending regulations and giving tax rebates, but the colonists were now ready to fight to make sure some large entity would tell them what to do. And many were rallied to the cause by Patrick Henry’s cry of ‘Give me a large government telling me what I can and can’t do while spending most of my money, or give me death!'” . . . humor columnist Frank J. Fleming . . .

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